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Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

2 edition of Hohokam marine shell exchange and artifacts found in the catalog.

Hohokam marine shell exchange and artifacts

Richard S. Nelson

Hohokam marine shell exchange and artifacts

by Richard S. Nelson

  • 9 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by Arizona State Museum, The University of Arizona in [Tucson] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Arizona.
    • Subjects:
    • Hohokam culture.,
    • Indians of North America -- Commerce -- Arizona.,
    • Indian shell engraving -- Arizona.,
    • Shells -- Arizona.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 99-108).

      StatementRichard S. Nelson.
      SeriesArizona State Museum archaeological series ;, 179
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsE99.H68 N45 1991
      The Physical Object
      Paginationx, 108 p. :
      Number of Pages108
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1669467M
      LC Control Number91622409

      "Hohokam Marine Shell Exchange and Artifacts", Arizona State Museum, The University of Arizona, Arizona State Museum Archaeological Series Oppelt, Norman T. "List of Southwestern Pottery Types and Wares with Dates and References to Descriptions and Illustrations". the Hohokam built wattle-and-daub dwellings around central plazas, whereas the Anasazi built stone masonry structures and apartments, sometimes on cliff walls. To help facilitate trade and exchange on the Plains, the tribes used.

      Richard S. Nelson has written: 'Hohokam marine shell exchange and artifacts' -- subject(s): Commerce, Hohokam culture, Indian shell engraving, Indians . HOHOKAM. HOHOKAM is the name given by archaeologists to a prehistoric culture centered along the Salt, Gila, Verde, and Santa Cruz Rivers in the low, hot Sonoran desert of southern Arizona between approximately b.c. and a.d. The name Hohokam means "those who have gone" in the language of the O'odham, the contemporary Native American inhabitants of southern Arizona.

        A Sense Of Place: Hohokam Rock Art Because of the difficulty of interpreting rock art, its value as a diagnostic artifact has been limited. A recent study of Hohokam rock art addressed this problem by taking the unusual approach of focusing on the images’ surroundings as . Hohokam (/ h oʊ h oʊ ˈ k ɑː m /) was a society located in the North American Southwest, in the areas now part of Arizona and Sonora, m practiced a specific culture, sometimes referred to as Hohokam culture, which has been distinguished by who practiced this culture can be called Hohokam as well, but more often they are distinguished as Hohokam people to.


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Hohokam marine shell exchange and artifacts by Richard S. Nelson Download PDF EPUB FB2

A synthetic treatment of shell exchange among Hohokam groups utilizing excavated and private collections. The author also provides details of shell : Richard S. Nelson. Hohokam Marine Shell Exchange and Artifacts. A synthetic treatment of shell exchange among Hohokam groups utilizing excavated and private collections.

The author also provides details of shell identification. Hohokam marine shell exchange and artifacts. [Tucson]: Arizona State Museum, The University of Arizona, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Richard S Nelson.

Introduction. The Hohokam were notable artisans of pottery, ground stone, and shell. A common artifact found on many Hohokam sites is the carved shell bracelet (more probably armlets) made from a whole Glycymeris(a type of bivalve-clam) shell that came from the Gulf of California.

Hohokam artisans used no fewer than 43 genera and 62 species of marine shell to fabricate a rich variety of ornaments and.

Howard, Ann Valdo,Late Archaic and Pioneer Period Shell Utilization: An Examination of Early Shell Production and Exchange within Arizona, Paper presented at the Hohokam Conference, by: 9.

The structure and organization of Hohokam shell exchange, The Kiva 52 (2): – Mindeleff, C. Casa Grande Ruin, in Thirteenth annual report of the bureau of American Ethnology, –Cited by: Marine shell artifacts and production processes at Shelltown and the Hind site.

In Marmaduke, W. S., and Martynec, R. (eds.), Shelltown and the Hindsite: A Study of Two Hohokam Craftsman Communities in Southwestern Arizona, Northland Research, Flagstaff, AZ, pp.

–Cited by: Regional approaches to the study of prehistoric exchange have generated much new knowledge about intergroup and regional interaction. The American South west and Mesoamerica: Systems of Prehistoric Exchange is the first of two volumes that seek to provide current information regarding regional exchange on a conti nental basis.

From a theoretical perspective, these volumes provide important. Since only a few shell and obsidian artifacts are generally In a series of scientific papers, Dr. Suzanne Fish, Dr.

Paul found on a Hohokam site, detailed evaluation of such items is Page 2 Archaeology in Tucson Newsletter Vol. 9, No. All Native American prehistoric pottery and artifacts have been legally acquired. They have not been stolen, falsified, forged, or restored (without being so stated) and further they have not been taken illegally from Federal Lands, Public Lands, State Lands, or Indian Lands in violation of the Archaeological Resources Act of SHELL IDENTIFICATION AND ANALYSIS PURPOSE A.

Hohokam Marine Shell Exchange and Artifacts by Nelson, Richard S. () B. It is highly recommended that a selection of articles from the Marine Shell Exchange in Northwest Mexico and the Southwest, in The American Southwest and Mesoamerica: Systems of Prehistoric Exchange, File Size: KB.

ANT Test 3 study guide by vsimmons includes 43 questions covering vocabulary, terms and more. Quizlet flashcards, activities and games help you improve your grades. Shell. Christine H. Virden-Lange has more than 20 years of experience conducting identification and analysis of marine and freshwater shell species found at prehistoric and historic sites in the Southwest United States.

She has an interest in the use of shell during the Early Agricultural period, shell production and exchange networks, and. & Hohokam The publication of this book was made Shell items, potsherds, and other artifacts from Hohokam sites Although Hohokam procurement and exchange activities (in shell, salt.

Arizona State Museum Archaeological Series The University of Arizona Press is pleased to distribute titles in the Arizona State Museum Archaeological Series, a scholarly, peer-reviewed, monograph series focused on the archaeology of northwest Mexico and the southwestern United States.

10 Ronna J. radley, ^Marine Shell Exchange in Northwest Mexico and the Southwest, in The American Southwest and Mesoamerica (Springer Science, ): 11 ibidem.

Richard S. Nelson has written: 'Hohokam marine shell exchange and artifacts' -- subject(s): Commerce, Hohokam culture, Indian shell engraving, Indians of North America, Shells.

Hohokam Shell Etching Indigenous Peoples’ Day approacheth–and that’s not the only reason I’ve been thinking about the native peoples of the United States recently. The Dakota pipeline controversy erupting through the midwest is a reminder that a. Ohio Historical Society archaeologists discuss marine shell artifacts.

ARCHAEOLOGICAL PARKS AND PREHISTORIC NATIVE Hohokam through trade and exchange. The Hohokam traded goods widely across the They were skilled artisans who carved marine shell jewelry stone palettes, and stone beads and pendants.

They also made a distinctive red-on-buff pottery and other ornate objects. - Native American artifacts. Anasazi / Hohokam shell ornaments. - Native American artifacts.

Anasazi / Hohokam shell ornaments. Stay safe and healthy. Please practice hand-washing and social distancing, and check out our resources for adapting to these times. Leo Zodiac Sign Book of Shadow Printable PDF page, Wicca.The Hohokam left these artifacts at the site over years ago. Scatters of prehistoric stone tools and pottery like these are common in the Tucson Mountains; they number in the hundreds, maybe even the thousands.

Most of the sites show no signs of habitation-no houses, no fire pits. So what did the Hohokam do in these mountains?Marine shell gorgets from Craig Mound, Spiro, probably made of conch (lightening whelk) from the northern Gulf coast. These artifacts often bear elaborate iconography associated with the Southern Cult.

Courtesy Robert Bell and the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, University of Oklahoma.